CLINICAL TRIALS

CURRENT STUDIES

Rheumatoid Arthritis

This study looks at whether a particular blood test is helpful in determining how active RA is, in certain patients.

Prospective Outcomes Study
Vectra® DA Guided vs. Usual Care
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02832297
More Information – Click Here

Ankylosing Spondylitis

This study looks at whether an approved medicine (COSENTYX) is effective at a higher dose for patients who did not have enough relief after the initial 15 weeks.

Dose Escalation Study
Drug Being Studied:  COSENTYX® (secukinumab)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03350815
More Information – Click Here

Psoriatic Arthritis

A study evaluating how well a new drug works in patients with Psoriatic Arthritis.

Study for a New Medicine
A study comparing Rizankizumab to placebo in subjects with PSA including those who have a history of inadequate response or intolerance to biologic therapy
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03671148
More Information – Click Here

Psoriatic Arthritis

A Study looking at how well an approved medicine, OTEZLA, works in a particular type of Psoriatic Arthritis.

Study to evaluate an approved medicine (OTEZLA®) for a specific type of Psoriatic Arthritis.
Efficacy and safety and tolerability study to treat early Oligoarticular Psoriatic Arthritis.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03747939
More Information – Click Here

Frequently Asked Questions

A clinical trial is a research study in which volunteers receive medications under the supervision of a physician and work with clinical research staff to determine how well you respond to a particular treatment or test.

In a clinical trial, a volunteer is usually assigned a specific study group.  At ARBDA – we, generally, do not participate in trials that have a placebo (ie, no active medicine).  This is done so that we can make sure that our patients have access to the new treatments being studied.

Clinical trials are the engine of medical progress. There is great need for people to take part in clinical trials because that is how researchers learn more about diseases and develop better treatments. Participants volunteer for a variety of reasons. They may be looking for a treatment solution that is superior to their current conventional therapy. They may want to learn more about their own health or take a more active role in their own healthcare. They may not have health insurance and would receive investigational drugs, associated visits, x-rays, and labs free of charge. Or, they may want to help in the search for better health for people in the future.

Here are some possible benefits you might get from taking part in a clinical trial.

You may:
• Play an active role in your healthcare as well as the healthcare of others.  Without clinical research, society would not have any new treatments available.  You can take pride in the fact that you helped others gain access to important new treatment options.
• Gain access to research treatments before they are available to the general public.
• Obtain ongoing medical care without copays or deductibles – all care related to the clinical trial is free of charge.
• Depending on the particular trial – clinical research-related medications are provided at no cost.
• In certain circumstances, you may be compensated for your time and reimbursed for travel expenses.

Like nearly everything in life – if there is a potential benefit, then there’s likely some risk involved.  However, the ARBDA Physicians & Clinical Research team only select trials which have the potential to impact a patients disease in a positive way.

The criteria that we use to select clinical trials is stringent and places the safety of our patients as the highest priority.  If you have questions or are interesting in participating in a Clinical Trial — your ARBDA physician will gladly discuss the possible risks and benefits from participating.